Showing 24 of 405 videos
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2:23
difficulty - Intermediate Intermediate
China

Historic Chinese Legends, Tales and Idioms Bu Dong Zhuang Dong Part 1

The idiom "bu dong zhuang dong" is used to describe someone who pretends to know about something, but is, in fact, clueless. In this video, a man often "bu dong zhuang dong" in order to look smart. Unfortunately, he only adds to his embarrassment when he is found out.

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2:12
difficulty - Beginner Beginner
China

Historic Chinese Legends, Tales and Idioms Bu Dong Zhuang Dong Part 2

Do you know whether ginger grows on the ground or in a tree? Unfortunately for the man in this video, neither does he.

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1:38
difficulty - Intermediate Intermediate
China

Historic Chinese Legends, Tales and Idioms Ban Men Nong Fu

This idiom literally means "to wield an axe in front of Lu Ban" and mocks someone who makes a fool of himself by showing off in front of an expert. It was coined by a Ming Dynasty scholar.

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2:03
difficulty - Intermediate Intermediate
China

Historic Chinese Legends, Tales and Idioms Bai Fa Bai Zhong

The idiom of "Bai Fa Bai Zhong" comes from a legend about an amazing archer in ancient China. See what he did to earn his place in the Chinese lexicon.

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2:08
difficulty - Beginner Beginner
China

Historic Chinese Legends, Tales and Idioms Bi Shang Bu Zu, Bi Xia You Yu

This story brings alive the Chinese idiom about contentment. It depicts how a small little bird that is not strikingly beautiful stays happy every day.

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1:23
difficulty - Beginner Beginner
China

Historic Chinese Legends, Tales and Idioms Ai Wu Ji Wu

This video explains the origin of the Chinese proverb "Ai Wu Ji Wu."

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2:05
difficulty - Adv-Intermediate Adv-Intermediate
China

Historic Chinese Legends, Tales and Idioms An Du Chen Cang Part 1

The story behind this idiom about deception comes from one of the most famous and fabled chapters in Chinese history, the much-dramatized rivalry between Xiang Yu and Liu Bang. After both generals helped to bring down the Qin Dynasty, Xiang Yu divided China into 18 kingdoms, taking vast, fertile territory for himself and giving Liu Bang remote, mountainous land.

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3:21
difficulty - Beginner Beginner
China

Historic Chinese Legends, Tales and Idioms An Du Chen Cang Part 2

The story continues with Liu Bang plotting to seize the strategically-important Guanzhong area with a clever tactic of deception dubbed "To Secretly Cross at Chencang." After defeating Xiang Yu, Liu Bang went on to found the Han Dynasty.

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2:04
difficulty - Beginner Beginner
China

Historic Chinese Legends, Tales and Idioms Yu Bang Zhi Zhen

Learn the story behind the idiom, "A third party benefits from a tussle."

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2:58
difficulty - Beginner Beginner
China

Historic Chinese Legends, Tales and Idioms An Wu Tian Ri

A grizzly tale of a mysterious series of murders in Qing-era Guangdong gives us a saying which means "an absence of justice." This video explains the origins of the phrase and breaks down its meaning character by character.

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1:50
difficulty - Beginner Beginner
China

Historic Chinese Legends, Tales and Idioms E Yu Feng Cheng

This Eastern Han-era story of a principled man who turned down a duke's invitation is the origin of an expression which means "to flatter and suck up to."

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2:13
difficulty - Beginner Beginner
China

Historic Chinese Legends, Tales and Idioms Gui Tu Sai Pao

Never look down on someone who is not as good as you in some areas. Here's why.

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3:09
difficulty - Beginner Beginner
China

Historic Chinese Legends, Tales and Idioms Weng Zhong Zhuo Bie

Learn how the story of two impostors inspired the idiom, "To catch a turtle in a jar" (To go after easy prey).

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1:17
difficulty - Beginner Beginner
China

Historic Chinese Legends, Tales and Idioms Yin Lang Ru Shi

Learn how a trusting shepherd inspired the idiom, "To usher the wolf into the house" (To ask for trouble).

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2:18
difficulty - Intermediate Intermediate
China

Historic Chinese Legends, Tales and Idioms Cheng Ren Zhi Mei Part 1

The idiom, "Cheng ren zhi mei," is explained through a story. It essentially means that we should help others succeed rather than pointing out their faults.

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2:26
difficulty - Intermediate Intermediate
China

Historic Chinese Legends, Tales and Idioms Cheng Ren Zhi Mei Part 2

The antagonist of the story, Wan Renxian, still hasn't learned to "Cheng ren zhi mei," laughing at his neighbor when he injures himself. However, when he is given another golden opportunity to do a good deed, the question becomes, will he finally take it?

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2:22
difficulty - Intermediate Intermediate
China

Historic Chinese Legends, Tales and Idioms Cheng Ren Zhi Mei Part 3

When Wan Renxian comes through at a time when he is most needed, his neighbors' reaction to his kindness isn't quite what he expects. Like "The Boy Who Cried Wolf," no one is willing to believe that this time, he is really telling the truth.

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0:58
difficulty - Intermediate Intermediate
China

Historic Chinese Legends, Tales and Idioms Cheng Ren Zhi Mei Part 4

Having discovered Wan Renxian's act of kindness, his neighbors apologize and thank him. Just as with the old fortune teller, Wan Renxian should be given a chance to right his wrongs. Such is the meaning of “Cheng ren zhi mei.”

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2:35
difficulty - Intermediate Intermediate
China

Historic Chinese Legends, Tales and Idioms Quan Ren Wei Shan Part 1

Learn the story behind the idiom, "To exhort people to do good."

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1:56
difficulty - Intermediate Intermediate
China

Historic Chinese Legends, Tales and Idioms Quan Ren Wei Shan Part 2

Learn the story behind the idiom, “To exhort people to do good.”

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2:16
difficulty - Intermediate Intermediate
China

Historic Chinese Legends, Tales and Idioms Quan Ren Wei Shan Part 3

Learn the story behind the idiom, “To exhort people to do good.”

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1:06
difficulty - Intermediate Intermediate
China

Historic Chinese Legends, Tales and Idioms Quan Ren Wei Shan Part 4

Learn the story behind the idiom, “To exhort people to do good.”

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