Showing 24 of 105 videos
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4:17

Lydia teaches us the weekdays, the seasons and the months in Chinese.

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2:23

Lydia explains how to read the clock in Chinese with a few examples.

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5:58

The proper use of Mandarin Chinese greetings can pave the way for establishing good relationships. In this episode you'll learn some practical words about greetings in Chinese.

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1:11
difficulty - Newbie Newbie
China

Nouns Animals

Introducing 30 kinds of animals in Mandarin. Include the most common kinds such as dog, cat, pig, chicken.

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0:59

There are some confusing Chinese words which are difficult for language learners to distinguish. Watch and find out how to pronounce "Shu" and "Xu."

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0:56

There are some confusing Chinese words which are difficult for language learners to distinguish. Watch and find out how to pronounce "Chi" and "Qi."

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0:55

There are some confusing Chinese words which are difficult for language learners to distinguish. Watch and find out how to pronounce "Zhi" and "Ji."

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0:55

There are some confusing Chinese words which are difficult for language learners to distinguish. Watch and find out how to pronounce "Shi" and "She."

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0:54

There are some confusing Chinese words which are difficult for language learners to distinguish. Watch and find out how to pronounce "Zhao" and "Jiao."

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0:52

There are some confusing Chinese words which are difficult for language learners to distinguish. Watch and find out how to pronounce "Zhe" and "Zhi."

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1:04

Inhale, exhale. Inhale, exhale. When was the last time you went to your yoga class?

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0:56

One, two , three, four, five. Are you feeling that stretch in your body?

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1:15

Inhale, exhale. Inhale, exhale. Let's do the downward dog position.

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1:50

Lydia teaches us how to talk about body parts in Chinese, about the head and face in particular.

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2:45

The Chinese idiom, "San Xin Er Yi," literally means, "Three hearts, two thoughts." It can be used to describe someone who splits his energy between many things instead of focusing on one task at a time. The simple vocabulary in this video gives an example of "San Xin Er Yi."

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1:51

This idiom is used as a metaphor for the punishment of a person to alert others to correct their behavior.

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1:30

Hear the story from which the saying, "Hun Shui Mo Yu" came about. It means to take advantage of a chaotic time or deliberately create confusion to obtain benefits.

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1:50

This Chinese idiom advises people not to give up halfway through or leave something unfinished.

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3:07

"Shou Zhu Dai Tu" means, "Sitting by a stump, waiting for a careless rabbit to hit the stump." Originally, it referred to the routineer in an ironic way. Later, the metaphor came to mean one does not take the initiative to work hard and wants to get a windfall.

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2:12

Do you know whether ginger grows on the ground or in a tree? Unfortunately for the man in this video, neither does he.

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